BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

DILEMMA
As if a child, perfect in faith, had come-
In aureoles about his head the mist
Of vast discovery-to show me some
New wonder squeezed perspiring in his fist,

One came to me bringing a scanty sheaf
Of boyish verses, and without a breath
He stood the while I turned them over leaf
By leaf, and something caught my sleeve like death:

So Shelley might have stood upon a day,
So Milton yet uncertain in the light,
And had I known how somberly the way
Went up before them lonely to the height,

And weighed with what a stuff a poet girds
His loins against the chill of thinner air,
To them also I might have said the words
I said to him-or else gone silent there.
-GLENN W. RAINEY.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES

CLARA LUNDIE ASKEW | JAMES R. BARRICK | ELMER GRANT CAMPBELL | MILDRED CLARK
DELORES AGUILAR DALTON | MARTHA HODGSON ELLIS | MAUDE LAY ELTON
MAVIS GAREY | AGNES KENDRICK GRAY | ERNEST HARTSOCK |DANIEL WHITEHEAD HICKY

CHARLES WILLIAM HUBNER | ARTHUR CREW INMAN | THORNWELL JACOBS
ROBERT LESEUR JONES | ELLIS ATKISSON McDONALD | GILBERT MAXWELL
WIGHTMAN FLETCHER MELTON | MINNIE HITE MOODY | CONSTANCE GAY MORENUS
ROBERT NORRIS | LOLA PERGAMENT | JANEF NEWMAN PRESTON | GLENN W. RAINEY
JAMES EDWARD ROUTH | ANDERSON M. SCRUGGS | RANDOLPH SHAFFER, JUNIOR
FRANK LEBBY STANTON | MARGUERITE STEEDMAN | LIDA WILSON TURNER
DAVID EDWARD UNGER | CATHERINE WALKER | MARSHALL WALKER, JUNIOR
MERLE G. WALKER | JAMES E. WARREN, JUNIOR | MARY BRENT WHITESIDE

An Atlanta Argosy

It is doubtless true that the personal element always holds the
highest point of interest, and as a consequence this book would be
incomplete unless it contained something about the people who have made it
possible. The information found in this section has been obtained in various
ways-by correspondence, in personal interviews, and by consulting the clipping
files in the Carnegie Library. In a few instances it has seemed fitting to quote the
author's own words. It is hoped that the reading of these pages will aid in serving
as a definite introduction to the contributors to this anthology.

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CLARA LUNDIE ASKEW
Clara Lundie Askew, a native born Atlantan, is the author of a book
of verse [Sparks from the Anvil]. She began writing at the age of ten, at
first for the entertainment of a beloved little sister-then for the sheer joy of creation
and later essentially for self-expression. In recent years she has turned
more to the writing of juvenile verse, the inspiration being a small
red-headed daughter. Miss Askew's poetry has been published and reprinted in
magazines, newspapers, and anthologies in many parts of the United States. She
is a great lover of the out-of-doors, music, books, and dogs. She says she loves
this "adventure called living." At present she is studying to become a doctor's
assistant, something she has always wanted to be.

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JAMES R. BARRICK

As co-editor of [Scott's Monthly Magazine], Major James R. Barrick of
the C. S. A. was a prominent figure in the literary world of the South. Born
in Kentucky in 1829 of Scotch-Irish ancestry, Major Barrick studied at
Urania College, Glasgow. He early showed a love for books and a talent for
writing and was known as the "Postmaster-Poet of Glasgow" at the age of
sixteen.
Living in a state which never left the union and where sympathy was
divided between the North and the South, young Barrick had to make his
decision about where to place his loyalty. He enlisted in the Confederate
army and rose to the rank of major. When his frail health kept him from
active service he began using his gifted pen for propaganda for the Southern
cause. Coming to Macon, Georgia, during the war, Major Barrick became
editor of the [Telegraph and Confederate]. His heartening poems, which appeared in the pages of this newspaper, cheered the drooping spirits of those
who were then tasting the bitterness of ultimate defeat.
After the war Major Barrick moved to Atlanta where he engaged in the
drug business. At this time Rev. Dr. Scott was searching for a man to be
associated with him as co-editor of the magazine he was in the act of
establishing, and Barrick proved to be that man. [Scott's Monthly Magazine], a
notable periodical, contains his finely phrased poems.
In 1868 James Barrick became the first editorial writer of the
Atlanta Constitution. After ten months' service in this capacity he resigned
because of ill health. Barrick died April 30, 1869, and is buried in Oakland
Cemetery, where a modest stone marks his grave.
So reads the simple life story of the man who is known to us as
Atlanta's first poet; of the man who, though not a native son, wrote the
first worth. while poetry of the city of his adoption. Dr. Lucien Lamar
Knight spoke of the poem "The Poet" as a beautiful fragment." Other poems of
Barrick as well as many witty sayings to which he gave the title "Aphorisms,"
are to be found in the bound copies of [Scott's Magazine] in the reference room
of the Carnegie Library.

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ELMER GRANT CAMPBELL

Elmer Grant Campbell, one who likes "folks" genuinely, yet writes of
man scientifically in textbooks with the titles [Whence and Whither of Man],
and [Man and Others], is at the present head of the Biology Department of
the University of Georgia Extension, Atlanta. Dr. Campbell was born in Fair.
burn, Georgia. He received his education at Hiram College of Ohio, Perdue
University, and the University of Chicago, from which he holds the degree
of doctor of philosophy. He is the author of two other textbooks: [General
Elementary Botany] and [The Problem Method of Teaching].
Dr. Campbell combines poetry writing with his sketches on the life
and habits of plants and animals. He is now engaged in working on a series of
such sketches, each concluding with a poem. "The Tumble-Bug" is a selection
from this work, which is soon to appear in print.

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MILDRED CLARK

Born in the city (Atlanta) yet loving the country, Mildred Clark
frequently uses themes from country life for her poetry. Her sonnet sequence
"Country Girl," which won first place in the annual contest in poetry
conducted by [Aurora], Agnes Scott literary magazine, reveals a keen insight
into the meaning of homely every-day joys of life in the country. Several of
her poems have been published in the [New York Times].
Miss Clark received her education at Humphries School, at Fulton High
School, and at Agnes Scott College. At present she is a teacher in the Center
Hill School in Fulton County.
The poem "New Teacher," after appearing first in the [New York Times],
was used as frontispiece in [All the Children], thirty-ninth annual report of
the Superintendent of Schools, City of New York, 1936-37.

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DOLORES AGUILAR DALTON

A newcomer and a native New Yorker, Dolores Aguilar Dalton is now
making her home in Atlanta, where she is taking part in two groups of
creative writers. She is a member of the Atlanta Writers' Club and poetry
chairman of the Amateur Writers' Club.
She received her education at Erasmus Hall High School and New York
University. After a year of nurse's training, she turned news reporter. She
states that she has been writing poetry since she was eight years old. Her
verse has been published in several important current magazines, as well as
in the Raven Poetry Anthology.
Dolores Dalton has just completed a book of poetry which will be
published shortly. She is now writing a novel in poetic prose. Her interests
are divided between the arts and her small daughter. Her newest hobby is
building a puppet show.

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MARTHA HODGSON ELLIS

Of herself Martha Hodgson Ellis writes: "I was born in Mount Airy,
Georgia, in 1905, in a big rambling house with a well on the back porch.
My mother is a Northerner, and my father a Southerner, so that I have
had the privilege of living in both sections of the Eastern seaboard. Most of
my life has been spent in Atlanta, where I attended the North Avenue
Presbyterian School. I attended the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania
for four years, and spent a year of travel abroad before I went to Mount
Holyoke College. After two years there I married Rutherford Ellis of Atlanta,
and have a boy and a girl to keep life interesting. Five of my happiest
summers were spent at the Luther Gulick Camps in Maine, and to this day I am
an earnest student of trees and flowers and had rather be out-of-doors than
indoors any time, any where."
Several of Mrs. Ellis' poems have been published in the Junior League
Magazine and in the North Georgia Review. The poem "Cape Cod," is one
of a prize-winning group read in the poetry contest at Mount Holyoke, with
Vassar, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr, and Smith competing.

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MAUDE LAY ELTON

A native of Arkansas, Mrs. Elton has made her home in Atlanta for a
number of years. Recently she received, along with her daughter. the
distinction of having been taken in as a member of the American Pen Women.
Her poem "Mothers Do Not Die" was published in the Paebar Anthology of
1936. She contributed four poems to the Galleon Anthology for 1937, and her
verses appear frequently in periodicals and poetry magazines. Mrs. Elton has
won first prize in the Atlanta Writers' Club, the Atlanta Woman's Club, and
prizes offered by local papers.
She is the author of [Chit-Chat Philosophy], a book of poems published
in 1932, which, according to the writer, was inspired by people, hundreds of
them, in the great reception halls at Mayo's Clinic. Mrs. Elton reveals that
she cannot be inspired by scenery alone, stating that "A garden is not a
garden until the gardener appears." Her second book of verse will come off
the press shortly.

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MAVIS GAREY

Mavis Garey was born in Saint Augustine, Florida, in 1914. She was
educated at Washington Seminary in Atlanta and at Radcliffe College in
Boston, Massachusetts where she studied Greek and English literature. At
present Miss Garey lives in Atlanta and devotes most of her time to writing
and study. Several of her poems were published in the Radcliffe Poetry
Anthology, 1935.

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AGNES KENDRICK GRAY

Agnes Kendrick Gray was born at Fort Schuyler in New York harbor, the
daughter of a Colonel of the Medical Corps, United States Army. Her mother
is a native Atlantan. She has lived in some of the most colorful army posts
throughout this country, and in the Phillipine Islands. At one time she
resided at Fort McPherson, Georgia. She has traveled extensively in the
Orient and in Europe and her poetry has been greatly influenced by the
history and beauty of the lands she has visited. Many of her poems reflecting
this influence appear in the "Travel Pictures" section of this collection.
She is a graduate (with Phi Beta Kappa) of Stanford University,
California, and did post-graduate work in English at Radcliffe College. Among
her professors of poetics at Stanford was Dr. Herbert Carruth, author of the
famous poem "Each in His Own Tongue."
Agnes Gray is a person of varied interests. Her proficiency in French
brought her the honor of being chosen an official French translator of the
Conference on Disarmament held in Washington, D. C. Two of her published
volumes are translations from the French. Her love of the classics is
shown in the poem "Horace of the Sabine Hills," which was awarded the
annual second prize, Poetry Society of America, November, 1934. Miss Gray's
essay on a pilgrimage to the grave of Keats, written for the one hundred and
ninth anniversary of the poet's death, was published in the London Sunday
Times. She contributed three poems to the volume of Lindbergh poems
commemorating his epochal flight and entitled 'The Spirit of Saint Louis."
And many of her best poems are written about the sea.
The work of Agnes Gray has won for her membership in the Poetry
Societies of America, of Georgia, and of Florida. She is also a member of
the Edward McDowell Association, having been a colonist for one summer at
the MacDowell Artist Colony at Peterborough, New Hampshire. Her poems
are published by the leading periodicals in America and England and have
received many prizes.
For a few years prior to her marriage, Miss Gray was director of
Rich's Bookshop. Here in 1929 she conducted the first Book Fair held in
Georgia. Many important Southern authors were guests of the exposition.
During this period she also gave "Book Talks" over WSB and appeared
frequently in poetry recitals in various important cities.
She is the author of a collection of poems, [River Dusk], and a
brochure of poetry, [Ports of Call], the latter published by the Phi Beta
Kappa Chapter of Stanford University, having been written by request for
the annual commencement program of that society. Agnes Kendrick Gray is
in private life Mrs. William Francis Ronald, and her present home is in
Daytona Beach, Florida.

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ERNEST HARTSOCK

"His was a life whose April stood
Like autumn bloody on a wood,
Yet like a perfect simile,
A splendor born of brevity."*
Surely these words apply to him who has been so frequently compared
to Keats, and whose twenty-seven brief years might also be termed a "splendor
born of brevity." Ernest Hartsock was born in Atlanta, May 5, 1903. He was
educated at Boys High School and at Emory university. He was instructor at
the Georgia School of Technology in 1927; Professor of Poetics, Oglethorpe
University 1929-30. He was the first Atlanta poet to win the annual award of
the Poetry Society of America. The prize-winning poem was "Strange Splendor,"
perhaps his best known work.
Although Hartsock was a musician-he played the piano and the organ
with very real distinction and power-and although he was a teacher and
loved his teaching, he thought of himself, first, last, and always as a poet.
His first loyalty in his 'mature years was to poetry, as a writer and as an
editor. In his editorial capacity he was obliged to read limitless
quantities of poetic manuscript. It is thought that this experience
intensified his dislike of the mincing, lady-like traditions in poetry. As
people like Amy Lowell, Sandburg, Masters, Millay, and others had rebelled
against the polite tradition of American verse, so Hartsock was one of those
in the literary renaissance of the South, which came late, who rebelled
against the lavender and old lace of Southern literature. Of his own work he
was fiercely critical, and if an occasional effect seems strained it may be
accounted for by the impatience and intolerance which he had come to feel for lazy
craftsmanship and uncritical versifying. His first interest was always his own writing,
pursued not as a mere avocation, but consciously and stubbornly as a high calling.
Hartsock's influence on younger poets also is patent even while it cannot be measured.
As his reputation grew he came to be called upon with increasing
frequency to serve as critic, judge, lecturer, and adviser. All these
activities, combined with his own writing and the editor-ownership of a
poetry magazine and a publishing business, made fearful inroads upon his
frail health. Ernest Hartsock died December 14, 1930, in his twenty-eighth
year. Assuredly he packed into the brief span of life allotted to him a
truly remarkable record of achievement.
"Strange Splendor" has been described as an eleven-stanza rhapsody
on the "terrible miracle" of man's existence. His "De Profundis" (Romance and
Stardust) fits admirably into the strains of Kreisler's "Old Refrain" as a
musical setting. It was sung at the unveiling of the memorial tablet to
Hartsock in the Carnegie Library. Several others of his poems have been
set to music. The poem "Second Coming," was chosen for the inscription
on the bronze tablet at the writer's grave in West-View Cemetery.
On May 5, 1932 a bust of Hartsock, by the sculptor Fritz Zimmer, was
unveiled at Oglethorpe University and placed in the library. Later in the
same year the young poet's name was carved on a memorial stone in "Authors'
Walk" at the Wren's Nest.
Ernest Hartsock published three volumes of Poems: [Romance and
Stardust] (1925); [Narcissus and Iscariot] (1927); [Strange Splendor] (1930); also
two original anthologies: ["The Wandering Eros, A Lover's Almanac]; and
[Patterns for Pan,"] a Sonnet Anthology.

*From "Requiem for John Keats" by Ernest Hartsock.

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DANIEL WHITEHEAD HICKY

Daniel Whitehead Hicky was born in Social Circle, Georgia, and very
shortly thereafter his parents moved to Memphis, Tennessee, where he was
educated in private schools. In 1919 the family came back to Georgia for
residence, locating in Atlanta, where he first began writing poems which
appeared in Frank L. Stanton's "Just from Georgia" column. He became
connected with a local cotton firm, where he remained for eight years,
continuing his writing during lulls in the routine of his office duties, and
in the evenings at his home. He writes with remarkable ease, rarely changing
a poem from its original version. He was president of the Atlanta Writers'
Club for two years, and is a member of the Poetry Society of America, and
the Author's League of America. In 1931 his sonnet sequence ["Machines,"]
tied for first prize of the Poetry Society of America.
Mr. Hicky is frequent contributor to a large number of the most
important magazines and periodicals of this country. Many of his poems are
included in numerous college textbooks, and for six or seven years his poems
have been included in Thomas Moult's annual volume, [Best Poems]. He has
read before the Poetry Society of America in New York, and at various other
poetry societies and organizations and has given lectures at the invitation
of Joseph Auslander of Columbia University. His sonnets are nearly always his
best poems, and his sea poems are particularly convincing. He has published
three volumes of poems and is now at work on the fourth.
Because of copyright restrictions we were able to reprint only a few of Mr
Hicky's poems in this compilation. In the bibliographical section, reference
is made to other well-known poems and to his three published volumes of
verse. His [Thirteen Sonnets of Georgia], which is illustrated by Cornelia
Cunningham, Atlanta artist, was issued to commemorate Georgia's Bi-centennial
celebration. In these poems the poet pays frank tribute to his native state.

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CHARLES WILLIAM HUBNER

A poet of international reputation, author of various important
historical volumes, painter, and musician was Charles William Hubner, one
of the most beloved and picturesque figures of the South. He began writing
at the age of thirteen and made contributions to literature for seventy-six
years. In 1928 Hubner, at the age of ninety-three, was named as the most
eminent living Southern poet and oldest American bard, and was chosen poet
laureate of Dixie by the Poetry Society of the South.
During a long life as a teacher, librarian, journalist and author,
Major Hubner enjoyed the friendship of many of the leading figures in the
literary world, including Whittier, Longfellow, Holmes, Harris, Lanier,
Stanton, and others. As a boy in his native city of Baltimore, he was a
chance witness of the funeral procession of Edgar Allen Poe.
Major Hubner had an important assignment during the battle of
Atlanta, during which he was in charge of the telegraph corps of the Southern
forces. From 1870 until his death in 1929 Major Hubner lived in Atlanta,
where he engaged in editorial work and literary composition, serving as
editor of [The American]. Later he held a position in the Carnegie Library.
He is the author of eleven published volumes.

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ARTHUR CREW INMAN

Although he has lived away from his native city for many years,
Arthur Crew Inman is a versatile poet who has carried far the fame of his
birth-place. He has written five small volumes of poetry with such engaging
titles as "Bubbles of Gold," "American Silhouettes," "Frost Fire," etc. Many
of Inman's best poems appear in 'American Silhouettes," in which the author
looks upon the city with the vision of a poet. It has been said that "a poet
can interpret in words the mute feelings of the millions who walk dumb
through the crowded byways of the man-built universe." And Inman has
achieved this admirably.
Under the title, [Shadows of Men], Inman's third volume of verse
([American Silhouettes]) was published in London and the author's reputation
as one of the more able of the newer poets became established on both sides
of the Atlantic.
Mr. Inman has supplied this brief autobiographical sketch:
"As for my own life, here are the main facts. I was born in Atlanta
on May 11, 1895, I went to school to Miss Emma Tuller in Atlanta first, then
to the Donald Fraser school in Decatur. After that, I went to boarding school
outside of Philadelphia, and to Haverford College at Haverford, Pennsylvania.
During my junior year at college I was taken ill, and was obliged to leave
college for good. That was in 1916, and I have been forced to be rather
saving of my physical strength since then. Until recently, most of the
summers were spent at Southwest Harbor, Maine. And since 1917 I have made
Boston my headquarters, with occasional trips to New York. In 1923 I was
married to Evelyn Yates of Washington, D. C., a Wellesley graduate. Mrs.
Inman travels to a considerable extent, but I have not done so for the last
ten or twelve years, on the theory that the game is not worth the candle."

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THORNWELL JACOBS

Thornwell Jacobs was born in Clinton, South Carolina on February 15,
1877. He was graduated from the Presbyterian College of South Carolina,
with the degree of B. A., in 1894 and M. A. in 1895 and from Princeton
Theological Seminary and Princeton University (M. A.) in 1899. From Ohio
Northern University he has received the degree of Doctor of Laws (1914)
and from the Presbyterian College of South Carolina the degree of Doctor of
Letters (1924) . His life work has consisted of the pastorate of the
Morganton, North Carolina, Presbyterian Church, Vice-Presidency of the
Thornwell Orphanage; literary work in Nashville, Tennessee, in association
with Senator Bob Taylor and John Trotwood Moore on the Taylor-Trotwood
Magazine, and the refounding of Oglethorpe University of which he was elected
President on January 21, 1915. His principal literary work consists of a [Life
of William Plumer Jacobs], the [New Science and the Old Religion], [The Islands
of the Blest], [The Oglethorpe Book of Georgia Verse], and the [Diary of William
P. Jacobs].

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ROBERT LESEUR JONES

Called a "second Chatterton," Robert Leseur Jones was a young poet of
unusual talent and promise. He was born May 25, 1910 near Norcross, Georgia,
at his parents' home on the Chattahoochee river. After his graduation
from Norcross High School he attended the Technological High School, where
he was a member of the Poetae Society. He entered actively into the work of
that organization and became the editor of the first volume of [Dawn Songs],
which contains much of his best verse.
He spent his freshman year in college at Emory University and the
following year he transferred to Oglethorpe University where he majored in
journalism. While a student there he edited two poetry magazines, the
[Bozart], founded by Ernest Hartsock, and the [Westminster], begun by Dr.
Thornwell Jacobs.
"Bob" Jones possessed a keen sense of humor combined with a deep and
sincere sympathy for the unfortunate. Music and poetry were the chief
interests of his life. He died in his senior year at Oglethorpe University,
March 8, 1933.

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ELLIS ATKISSON MCDONALD

Ellis Atkisson McDonald was born in Athens, Georgia in 1912. She is a
graduate of the Decatur High School. She attributes her love of poetry to the
inspiration received from her grandmother, who taught her many old Southern
songs that the world has half forgotten. Mrs. McDonald says that she
has been scribbling verse ever since she was a small child. For her special
interests she lists music, books, and dogs. She contributes frequently to
magazines and periodicals.

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GILBERT MAXWELL
Gilbert Maxwell, at present a member of the Atlanta Federal Theater
Company, and author of two volumes of poems, was born in Washington,
Georgia. As a youth he came to Atlanta where he found employment in a local
department store. Maxwell, however, was ambitious for a literary career and
soon came to know and become a protege of Ernest Hartsock.
In 1931 Maxwell left Atlanta for New York, with little capital except
high hopes and several of his earlier poems. In the Eastern metropolis he
served a veritable apprenticeship of starvation, living as he says, "by the
grace of God, my wits, and the generosity of my friends." He worked in turn
as a window dresser, check-room boy at the Town Hall Club, professional
photographer's model, and bill collector. Later he served as manuscript
reader for juvenile books in a New York publishing house. In 1932, when he
was 22 years old, he was invited to become a member of the Poetry Society of
America. In the summer of 1934 he attracted wide attention with his own
radio program over the NBC chain on which he read poetry, his own verse
and poems by others, to a background of piano music created especially for
him by Morton Gould.
Meanwhile his verse began to appear with increasing frequency in
leading publications and soon Maxwell was giving readings in numerous other
cities both in the East and in the South. In November, 1933, his first volume
of poems [Look to the Lightning] was published, and on the strength of the
critical acclaim accorded that volume, the author received a scholarship to
Rollins College. where he specialized in journalism and dramatics. He was
represented in Thomas Moult's [Best Poems] for the years 1934 and 1937. His
second book [Stranger's Garment] appeared in 1936.
In May, 1938, in an article appearing in the [Christian Science
Monitor Weekly], John Ritchey discussed Gilbert Maxwell as one of ten
significant poets currently functioning in the United States.

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WIGHTMAN FLETCHER MELTON
A native of Tennessee, Dr. Melton was graduated from Peabody College
for Teachers in 1889, and received a Ph.D. degree from Johns Hopkins
University in 1906. As a teacher he has been on the faculties of prominent
educational institutions both in Alabama and in Georgia. Dr. Melton was
formerly an editorial writer for [The Atlanta Georgian] and the [Griffin Daily
News], and more recently editor of [Bozart- Westminster], a national magazine
of verse. He is now associated with the State Department of Education in
the publications division. He is .president of the Atlanta Writers' Club. Dr.
Melton is probably best known as a friend of poets and of other writers, and
as a source of inspiration and sympathetic guidance for struggling young
authors.

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MINNIE HITE MOODY
Minnie Hite Moody is known to the reading public chiefly as the
author of four successful novels. However, her poetry has won high
recognition, appearing in the leading periodicals and not infrequently
winning coveted prizes.
In a recent interview given the press Mrs. Moody stated that as a
little girl in grammar school she looked seriously at her teacher one day
and said, "There's not a bit of use in my studying arithmetic. I'm going
to be a writer anyway." And to carry out her threat she began auctioning
off English themes in exchange for arithmetic problems.
Writing of herself and her work Mrs. Moody says: "Nothing seems so
difficult to set down in interesting form as the bald facts that one was born,
educated, married, published, et cetera. However, briefly, I was born in
Granville, Ohio, early in the present century. As to my education, I was
attending high school when the World War came along. The week after my
graduation I enrolled in the Student Nurse Reserve and entered training, but
before the year was over I was married a Camp Jackson, S. C., to Lieut.
Wilkie O. Moody, who is now athletic director for boys at the William A.
Bass Junior High School, Atlanta. We have two daughters. Elizabeth and Mary
Louise.
"I have been writing all my life and professionally for about fifteen
years, though I had published and sold miscellaneous poems and stories as
early as my ninth year. My four novels are: [Once Again in Chicago] (1933),
published in England in 1934 as [Once Again at the Fair]; [Death Is a Little Man]
(1936); [Towers With Ivy] (1937), also published in England in 1937; and
[Old Home Week] (1938). In addition to the four novels, poems, short stories,
and critical articles of mine have been printed in a long list of periodicals."
As a hobby Mrs. Moody cites golf-when she can find the time. Her
interest in golf led her to use the East Lake course as the setting for a
short story, "Nightshade," which was published in [Vanity Fair].
In addition to her family Mrs. Moody states that her household
consists of "a faithful servant, a dog and various cats, in a house with
pillars and a wistaria vine, seven fireplaces, and an out-kitchen which has a real
hearthstone."

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CONSTANCE GAY MORENUS

Constance Gay Morenus gives this interesting information about
herself and her work: "Although born in Brooklyn, New York, because of my
parents residence there of some years, I was educated in Richmond, Virginia
at John Marshall High School and Westhampton College. I continued
my study of French and Spanish language and literature at Columbia
University, in Puerto Rico, and in Spain and France. After receiving my M.A.
from Columbia, I taught more or less conventionally in John Marshall High
School and at Westhampton College. Since I came to Atlanta some years
ago, I have gratified my liking for varied activities, having been secretary,
librarian, clerk, amateur actress, writer of verse, gardener (also amateur),
housekeeper, mother, and teacher again in the Lovett School and at present
at Washington Seminary."
Mrs. Morenus was represented in the Paebar Anthology of Magazine
Verse in 1934; her poems have been published in poetry magazines and other
periodicals.

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ROBERT NORRIS

Robert Norris was born in Atlanta in 1915 and was educated at the
Commercial and the Technological High Schools. Although a young business man,
Norris is nevertheless a student of philosophy and of the deeper significance
of verse and verse writing. "Some Brooklet Be" is a fragment from a longer
poem.

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LOLA PERGAMENT

An Atlantan by adoption, but one who has done some of her most
important writing in this city is Lola Pergament. In response to the request
for an autobiographical sketch Miss Pergament wrote:
"I was born in New York City on July 28, 1913 and have lived at
various times in New York, St. Louis, Chicago and Atlanta. For reasons of
personal contentment I have decided to make Atlanta my home, having come back
to this city three times for a general total of eight years.
"I received my formal education at Washington University at St.
Louis. Since then I have been advertising copywriter (St. Louis), the owner
of a small bookshop (Chicago) and for two years editorial writer for the
Federal Writers' Project of Georgia (from which I resigned to devote my time
to creative writing).
"At the present time I am especially interested in poetic drama as an
effective vehicle for communicating poetry to a wide audience. It has been
the cry of poets for innumerable years that their work has been limited in
appeal chiefly because the public at large considers poetry a luxury apart
from life. I feel that the visual aspects of the theater, combined with the
theater's communicating powers, can successfully enforce the living realities
of poetry."
She has written poetry which has appeared in some of the leading
periodicals and in many reprinting newspapers and magazines. She has also
appeared in several anthologies, the latest [American Stuff], a collection
of creative work by Federal Writers, which was lately published. In this
volume are excerpts from a suite of social-conscious poems entitled "Anguish
Take the Strong."

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JANEF NEWMAN PRESTON

Janef Newman Preston, a teacher in the English Department at Agnes
Scott College, is by birth a South Carolinian. She is a graduate, with Phi
Beta Kappa, of Agnes Scott College and holds a Master's degree from Columbia
University.
In connection with her teaching Miss Preston sponsors "B. O. Z.," one of
the creative writing clubs at' Agnes Scott. This organization is concerned
chiefly with short story and essay writing.
Janef Preston has published verse in a few periodicals and has won
some of the prizes of the Poetry Society of Georgia. She is interested in
poetry in the traditional manner, music (especially the music of Bach),
biology, and gardening.

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GLENN W. RAINEY

"As to myself," writes Glenn W. Rainey. a member of the English
Department of the Georgia School of Technology, "my life has in some respects
been split in two. I have done my college work and my graduate work in
history and political science, and for a long time I have been interested in
social and economic problems-war and peace, economic maladjustments, racial
injustices-and I have tried to be diligent in working for what seem to me to
be the decencies. I have been especially interested in Southern and Georgia
problems. I was born in Atlanta and have always lived here, with the
exception of two years of graduate work at Northwestern. I have what amounts
to a real love of the city and of the state,' though I have tried to be
discriminately critical of both. My master's thesis was 'The Race Riot of
1906 in Atlanta.' I am now studying the relation of the Negro to Georgia
politics. I like people. I am very much interested in the welfare of plain
working people. I find an intense pleasure in teaching.
"I got into teaching English partly through my interest in public
speaking and partly through my zest for reading. Throughout my life I have
found the greatest satisfaction in books. This leaning was encouraged at Boys
High and at Emory."
While a student at Emory, Glenn Rainey served one year as business
manager of the [Emory Phoenix], during the editorship of Ernest Hartsock.
He was also very closely associated with Hartsock in his later work.
His poems have been published in a number of periodicals, poetry magazines,
and anthologies.

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JAMES EDWARD ROUTH
James Edward Routh was born in Petersburg, Virginia, January 1, 1879.
Dr. Routh is a Ph.D. of Johns Hopkins University. He taught in several
universities before he came to Georgia to accept a position at Oglethorpe
University. For the past three years he has been Director for Languages and
Literature at the Evening College and Atlanta Junior College of the
University System of Georgia. He has taught four summers in the Johns Hopkins
Summer School. Dr. Routh is the author of many articles in the Philological
Journal. He was one of the co-editors of the [Oglethorpe Book of Georgia
Verse], to which he also contributed several poems. He is the editor of
[Bozart-Westminster], a national magazine of verse.

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ANDERSON M. SCRUGGS

Although with Dr. Scruggs the writing of poetry is an avocation, he
is one of the best known of the Atlanta poets. He was born in West Point,
Georgia, in 1897, but he moved to Atlanta in 1905. After his graduation
from the Atlanta-Southern Dental College he became one of the instructors
in the school, where he is now professor of histology. Dr. Scruggs states,
however, that he is as conscientious about his poetry as he is about his
professional progress. He is a member of the Poetry Society of America.
Dr. Scruggs' first book of poems, [Glory of Earth], containing
seventy-six of his poems, was published in 1933 by the Oglethorpe University
Press. This book went into a second printing, June, 1937. Dr. Scruggs has
been represented for eight out of the last nine consecutive years in the [Best
Poems] series of anthologies compiled annually by Thomas Moult, London critic,
published both in New York and in London.
His best known poem, "Glory to Them," is included as part of the
ritual services in [The Beacon Song and Service Book], published by the Beacon
Press, Boston, Massachusetts. His poems have also been widely reprinted in
a number of anthologies and have appeared in many outstanding magazines
and periodicals. Another poem, "Street Beggar," has been incorporated
in [Contemporary American Literature and Religion], by Dean Halford Luccock of
the Yale School of Divinity. Two others, "Negro Settlement" and "Golden
Siege," are included in [Poetry, Prose and Drama for Oral Interpretation], a
textbook edited by William 'J. Farmer, New York University.
One of his chief delights is reading with his fifteen-year-old
daughter; the two of them are extremely compatible. Dr. Scruggs is also
very fond of taking long walks, preferably at night.

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RANDOLPH SHAFFER, JUNIOR
A "close-up" of Randolph Shaffer, Junior: "I am twenty-four, an
Atlantan educated in the Middle West, out of a job, in need of a haircut and
all the usual bunk. In my time I have 'done everything' from selling
multi-millionaires eighteenth century Georgian silver to welfare work among
the sharecroppers. The future will record that my work both materially and
intellectually has been precisely as much value to this world as buttons on
a lampshade.
"Such then, is the want ad of my life. You can publish it in any
paper you like."
Such modesty is rare, even in a poet. In all justice to him, however,
it should be added that Randolph Shaffer, Junior, is writing some
exceptionally good verse and his best work promises a high order of poetic
excellence.

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FRANK LEBBY STANTON

Frank L. Stanton has been termed the first newspaper columnist. "News
from Billville," later called "Up from Georgia," his daily column in the
[Atlanta Constitution], was marked by its charm and simplicity. Carrying a
message of persistent optimism, it attracted a wide circle of readers.
Indeed, the writings of few American poets have been more popular, both in
the United States and in Canada. It is said that the little quatrain "This
World" is the most quoted poem in the world. The familiar words of this poem
are carved on the memorial tablet marking the author's grave in West View
Cemetery.
Stanton was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1857. He received a
common school education and was apprenticed at the early age of twelve as
a printer. From 1889 until his death in 1927 he was editorial writer for the
[Atlanta Constitution]. Frank L. Stanton was named Poet Laureate of Georgia
in 1925. Many of his poems have been set to music.

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MARGUERITE STEEDMAN

An Atlantan born and bred, Marguerite Steedman was educated in the
Atlanta grammar schools and at the Girls High School. She has been writing
verse for about fifteen years. Her poems have been published in many important
periodicals and poetry magazines. She has won numerous seasonal and
yearly contests conducted by the Atlanta Writers' Club and her work has
appeared in several anthologies.
Her chief interests are in foreign languages, principally French and
Greek; in the collection of unusual phonograph records, particularly
recordings of 17th and 18th century music; and in the study of Scottish
history and folklore. Her first play, "Beyond the Road," directed .by Paul
Carpenter, Jr., was presented in October, 1938, by members of the Atlanta
Theatre Guild.
At present she is staff feature writer on the Sunday Magazine
Section of The Atlanta Journal.

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LIDA WILSON TURNER

Lida Wilson Turner gives, as an explanation of how she received her
inspiration to write verse, the following:
"Some years ago my nine-year-old daughter said she had to write a
'pome' for school next day and simply could not do it; then with the perfect
faith of childhood asked me to do it for her. I sent her out doors, told her
to look around and then come back and tell me what she saw. With a little
help from me, she wrote her poem and the teacher liked it.
"That is how I began to write verse myself. I had written a number of
poems while in college but had not devoted any time to writing since then.
After I had a small collection of poems typed, I timidly submitted them to
a juvenile magazine and sold them all.
"I have always been interested in sports, especially golf. Our home
in Ansley Park faces the golf course so I have written many songs of the
course, which have been published in sports magazines. I am fond of
out-of-doors and have found many poems among my flowers. After all, are there
any happier subjects for poetry than children and flowers?"
Mrs. Turner was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, but moved South in infancy.
She attended the public schools of Asheville, North Carolina and of
Jacksonville, Florida and is a graduate of Asheville College for Women. After
finishing college she taught expression at Gordon College, Barnesville,
Georgia. Shortly after her marriage to Mr. C. Gainer Turner of Barnesville,
she moved to Atlanta, which has been her home ever since.
At present Mrs. Turner is State Vice-President of the National League
of American Pen Women, and a member of the Poetry Society of America. Her
poems have been published in many leading magazines and newspapers in this
country. She is the author of [Flagstones and Flowers].

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DAVID EDWARD UNGAR
David Edward Ungar was born in New York City, April 13, 1895. He
attended New York public schools and was graduated from the Boys' High
School, Atlanta. He has done college work at the University Evening School,
Atlanta.
He is employed in a clerical capacity at the offices of the Southern Railway
System. He has been writing verse for several years; some twenty-odd of
them appeared in Frank L. Stanton's column "Just from Georgia." It was
Stanton who first encouraged him to write verse.

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CATHERINE WALKER
Catherine Poyas Ravenal Walker's poems perpetuate the memory of a
rich personality that won and held a host of friends, and that reveal her
delicate humor, her love of nature and her wide learning.
Though born in Charleston, South Carolina, Miss Walker claimed
Atlanta as "home." A graduate of Carnegie Library School of Atlanta, she rose
high in her profession and held many important positions in various parts of the
country. For some time also Miss Walker was prcminently connected with
the Carnegie Library of Atlanta.
Besides poetry Catherine Walker wrote some short stories, worked with
the [Atlanta Constitution] and the [Atlanta Journal], and published a "Survey
of Hospitals of Georgia" in the Journal of the Medical Association of Georgia
in 1932. The same year her article "When the Doctor Prescribes Books,"
featured in the [American Journal of Public Health], excited wide and favorable
comment.
After her death in 1934, Catherine Walker's poems were published in
a memorial volume. The poem in this collection is taken from that book.

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MARSHALL WALKER, JUNIOR
Born in Atlanta in 1916,Marshall Walker, Junior, received his
education in the public schools of the city. He occupies a clerical position
at Fort McPherson and pursues the study of poetry and poetry writing as an
avocation. Nevertheless, he has a serious regard for his work as a writer of
verse 'and states that he is primarily interested in philosophical poetry.
His other interests are drawing and music.

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MERLE G. WALKER
Classifying herself as properly speaking not a poet at all, but a
teacher and a student of philosophy, Merle G. Walker nevertheless has made
two notable contributions to this compilation. Mrs. Walker was born in
Virginia in 1911. She did undergraduate work at Hollins College and received
an A.B. degree there in 1931. The next three years she spent doing graduate
work in the field of philosophy at Harvard. In 1936 she received a Ph.D.
degree from Radcliffe.
Since September, 1936, Mrs. Walker has been associated in varying
capacities with the University System of Georgia Junior College. Besides her
occasional poems which have been published in the [Lyric], [Saturday Review of
Literature], and [Bozart-Westminster], Merle Walker has written articles on
philosophical subjects for the [Philosophical Review], published at Cornell
University, and [Ethics], published at the University of Chicago.
She is the wife of Dr. A. J. Walker, professor of English at the
Georgia School of Technology.

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JAMES E. WARREN, JUNIOR
James E. Warren, Junior, who teaches English at Commercial High
School, is the third Atlanta poet to bring home the hundred dollar award
which goes each year to the American poet and member of the Poetry Society
of America who, in the opinion of the judges, has written the finest poem.
Competition for the prize is nation-wide.
"Final Lightning" is the title of the prize-winning poem and in it
the poet describes how Atlanta would look in an air raid. Mr. Warren relates
that the idea for the poem came to him during a conversation with a friend.
Later, the whole scene took form in his mind.
"I saw an imaginary bomber fly over Peachtree and let fall its load
of death. The streets were filled with shivered glass, blood, and bodies. The
boys with whom I had played tennis in Piedmont Park so many times were
in uniform now-when they weren't underground. That was the begining of
'Final Lightning."'
James Warren was born in Atlanta in 1908. After finishing at the Boys
High School, Mr. Warren entered Emory University, from which he was
graduated in 1930. He was assistant editor of the [Emory Phoenix], to which
he began to contribute poetry. His verse appears frequently in leading
periodicals and magazines.
He is the associate editor of [Versecraft]. For recreation he enjoys
tennis, fencing, and walking.

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MARY BRENT WHITESIDE
Mary Brent Whiteside was born in Shelbyville, Tennessee, but in early
childhood she came to live in Atlanta, where she was for many years very
prominent in literary circles. After some time spent in California, Miss
Whiteside is now residing in New York City. She is an honorary member
of the Craftsman Poetry Group and an active member of the Poetry Society
of America and of the Women Poets. Recently she served as technical
adviser and associate editor of the Poe Memorial Anthology, [Muse].
Unfortunately we were unable to secure a contribution from Miss
Whiteside for this book. Reference is made in the section on bibliography to
her one published volume of verse, and attention is called to many of her
best-known poems. Her work has received wide and favorable recognition in both
England and America.

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